violent man sees himself in a woman's body ?


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Virtual reality in therapy: If a violent man sees himself in a woman's body


Virtual reality technology tests show that our presence of someone else's body will promote empathetic behavior and help with body image issues. • Professor Maria (Mavi) Sánchez Vios, director of one of Spain's leading virtual reality research laboratories, is already treating men with girl abuse. Their husband and children.


"How confused they have lost their ability to have a name," Ivri Lider, in his 2002 song "Cafes," named Internet users. Users stripped of their bodies and identities on the Internet of yesteryear, when there were still no pictures, so they could send words to the virtual space without We will know who they are, where they live, what their ancestry is or what their parents are doing, whether they are beautiful or skinned, rich or poor, men, women or whatever in between.


The liberty only lasted for a decade. Even before Facebook came into being, people started uploading photos and identifying themselves in the networking sites which created long-term relationships with their official names. Facebook, Instagram, Watt sap and even a visual social network like Twitter people almost always connect identities of their peers in the "real " world with their identities. Social networks have, paradoxically, reduced our space for identity. While we could follow a slightly unique identity at each session in the past, today we are projecting a single identity across all channels and we need to align it with the identity we present in the actual world at each session.


Typically , we may say we've given up the concept of an alternate identity, but now virtual reality technology advancement is likely to bring the challenge back to the center stage, including for psychological treatment.


Prof. Maria (Mavi) Sanchez Vios, director of the IDIBAPS Research Institute's Virtual Reality Laboratory in Spain, started using this technology as a brain research tool 15 years ago. Virtual reality regarded her research as one of the world's leading laboratories for researching psychology and the brain today. On Thursday, April 11, she will lecture on her research at the Advanced Reality Research Laboratory and Sami Ofer School of Communication's "Virtual Reality: The Body, Self and The Other" conference at IDC Herzliya.


"We quickly realized that it's not so hard to create an illusion that the body we see in virtual reality is ours," Sanchez and Yus said in an interview with "Globes." "You 'd think it would be more difficult-we've become accustomed to living in a certain body that usually undergoes small and slow changes for many years.


What is the manipulation?

"Through several channels, humans develop a perception of their bodies. First, they see from the eyes that are inside this body, and so we put on the virtual reality glasses in the laboratory so that the perspective will be as if we were seeing the virtual world out of our eyes. Or in virtual appearance, we'll see the body of the avatar where we'd expect to see our body.


The idea of merging is important. If you see someone touching your hand in the virtual world, you'll know it without actually hitting your hand, too.


"We've built glove and shirt systems that can vibrate or apply pressure in tandem with what's happening on the screen, so the sensation of contact is genuine."


Sanchez Vios explains our brains are constantly seeking coherence and actively constructing a story from the information that comes into it. The need for coherence overcomes the logical understanding that this isn't really about our bodies, and thus very fascinating illusions can form.


"You can make a person feel their nose is longer or shorter. You can make a person feel that their hand is very long. If we create a stimulus that matches what you see on the screen, you can give people the feeling that one hand is longer than the other, even up to four times longer, despite the lack of logic." "At some point the illusion disappears. If we see in the virtual reality that our hand is over four times the actual hand, we do not perceive it as our hand, even though we can monitor it and get the correct sensory stimulus."


Physical experience calls forth empathy

They published experiments examining the psychological effects of body replacement as early as the late 1990s. One fascinating experiment is exploring what the world looks like from the viewpoint of a child. They shoot the image in such a way that the eye line positioned lower and the objects appear higher in the distance. Looking down on the body, or in a virtual mirror, it will expose a circular, child-shaped body. So is the shoes.


Experimental participants, who asked to measure object size, automatically measured distances and heights as being higher and distant. Sanchez Vios says, "The way you view yourself influences how you perceive the world." However, besides the new viewpoint, the adults in the simulated body of a child appeared to identify more with their characteristics that were infantile. These phenomena were less effective when the virtual body was of "shrinking person" and not of an infant.


Can the illusion of the child's body help adults recapture memories of childhood, the experience of child wonder, or innocence and curiosity? Not these have investigated yet, but researchers do not deny it. The possibility that the experience will increase empathy among teachers and parents of children under their care not negated either. Today it's still unclear how long its effect will continue after the illusion.


"There are other examples of how behavior affects your own virtual body experience," says Professor Doron Friedman, head of the Interdisciplinary Advanced Reality Laboratory. "A recent study found that the computability of people who experienced themselves in the body of Albert Einstein improved.


I particularly like the analysis where the participants asked to drum. Half of the participants perceived themselves as being a professionally dressed white person and half viewed themselves with dreads and casual wear in a black person's body. In the second, informal party, more moved subjects.


Such work teaches us, not just how to expand our experiences in this world through virtual reality, but also possibly how our actual bodies influence our everyday lives, even before entering any virtual picture.


The Sexual Assault technology solution?

In a study of the violence of men, Sanchez and Joses connected men to the virtual body of a woman. "One in four women experiences violence during their lives from their spouse. It's happening everywhere, not just in those countries or cultures, "she says.


Friedman, who was eager to experiment with this process (albeit not, of course, as a treatment), says of the experience: "I looked down and immediately I saw a cleavage. "A man bigger than me. Threateningly approaching, he takes my mobile phone and throws it down to the floor."


True cell phone?

Vios: "Forbid you god!"

You might tell the men did not really have a violent encounter in your investigation. You probably didn't really hit them. It just doesn't hurt.


Sanchez and Jos: "Of course we didn't hurt them, but the situation was probably scary enough to generate some empathy. Before going through the process, the violent men in the experiment (but not the control group) failed to detect a facial expression of fear in the images of women we presented to them. "They identified many of the frightened faces as happy. It became much easier to identify fear in photos of women after the cycle was over.


The study published about a year ago and has already integrated into the treatment of violent men in Catalonia, Spain. Not all patients respond to rational, formal learning. "Besides the scenario that presents a woman's point of view, a scenario that presents a child's point of view also developed because some patients were violent towards their children."


Friedman says that interdisciplinary students are currently designing such a program to expose people to the sexual harassment experience from the harassed's viewpoint, "but this is not a research project, it is an activist."


Is it possible to pass on the experience of sexual harassment to a person who does not carry all the emotional baggage of gender and without passing it on to an actual unwanted sexual contact? If they turn the activist move into research, we may get answers to these questions.


Psychologists and artists in the experimental field


In Israel, some scholars have used this approach to arouse empathy between Israelis and Palestinians. In a video showing a situation where a soldier points a gun at a child, I asked the subjects to stand in the soldier's position and the child's place. "Even the most patriotic Israelis spoke less emphatically after having an experience with a rifle aimed at them," says Friedman. For logistical reasons, Palestinians did not take part in the experiment and whether they could identify with the soldier examined.


Art work using virtual reality technology sent Israelis and Palestinians to a virtual tour of each other's homes rather than to the heart of the conflict.


The artist, Daniel Landau, described the experience as " non-threatening, but having a tragic underground flow" in the British Guardian newspaper because Israelis and Palestinians were so surprised to discover similarities in life on both sides of the fence and on other points Differences that show a dramatic quality of life gap between people living just a few miles apart.


Today, Landau is the "home maker" at the Interdisciplinary Center in Friedman's virtual reality lab, enriching the study scripts with information and ideas.


Sanchez and Joses say there was an increase in empathy and a decline in racism in studies that examined black and white subjects after staying inside a virtual body of the other race for some time. "It only occurs when you imagine yourself inside a black (or white) body, not purple, which means they heighten empathy when you really encounter yourself in the other shoes, and not if you feel a sense of difference," she stresses.


In the last few years, field work has advanced tremendously, with virtual reality helmets becoming more available, Friedman and Sanchez Vios claim. Today they can buy these helmets at the price of a game console from commercial companies. The technology has also enhanced itself, and is now more practical. This allows not only researchers to experiment with the idea of a virtual body in leading labs, but also any psychology student, artist, and other curious students.


"Because of the excitement for the potential therapeutic aspect of this technology , the virtual reality that integrates the illusion of another body will enter the market first through psychology and the care world, and only then can it hit customers," says Friedman. They have developed a startup around Sanchez and iOS labs that develop a product called Vespect I designed to increase the world's empathy through VR.


Virtual reality technology is at the forefront of research into other treatment fields, not linked to communication with each other. This can help boost body image, for example. In a research carried out in 1998, I asked people with dysphoria to perceive their bodies as different.


The artist, Daniel Landau, described the experience as " non-threatening, but having a tragic underground flow" in the British Guardian newspaper because Israelis and Palestinians were so surprised to discover similarities in life on both sides of the fence and on other points Differences that show a dramatic quality of life gap between people living just a few miles apart.


Today, Landau is the "home maker" at the Interdisciplinary Center in Friedman's virtual reality lab, enriching the study scripts with information and ideas.


Sanchez and Joses say there was an increase in empathy and a decline in racism in studies that examined black and white subjects after staying inside a virtual body of the other race for some time. "It only occurs when you imagine yourself inside a black (or white) body, not purple, which means they heighten empathy when you really encounter yourself in the other shoes, and not if you feel a sense of difference," she stresses.


In the last few years, fieldwork has advanced tremendously, with virtual reality helmets becoming more available, Friedman and Sanchez Vios claim. Today they can buy these helmets at the price of a game console from commercial companies. The technology has also enhanced itself and is now more practical. This allows not only researchers to experiment with the idea of a virtual body in leading labs, but also any psychology student, artist, and other curious students.


"Because of the excitement for the potential therapeutic aspect of this technology, the virtual reality that integrates the illusion of another body will enter the market first through psychology and the care world, and only then can it hit customers," says Friedman. They have developed a startup around Sanchez and iOS labs that develop a product called Vespect me designed to increase the world's empathy through VR.


Virtual reality technology is at the forefront of research into other treatment fields, not linked to communication with each other. This can help boost body image, for example. In a research carried out in 1998, I asked people with dysphoria to perceive their bodies as different.


A chance to rid yourself of problem behaviors

Behavior counseling is another form of therapy. For example , they can educate people suffering from audience anxiety by putting them in rehearsals before a simulated audience.


People can freed and educated into a virtual environment before they get rid of habits that researchers perceive as harmful. The alternative action would slowly become a habit.


In the same way, it can generate motivation. For example , a person recovering from an illness and walking training will get the feeling that he is running in a healthy body in the open air and will not struggle with every step of a closed clinic on a treadmill. These are all avenues which are actually at the forefront of science.


Meanwhile, the gaming landscape taken over by virtual reality, so there could be a less optimistic impact too.


The script may either stereotype into the game or reward negative behaviour. In addition, all the therapeutic benefits of body reconstruction in virtual reality may become drawbacks if integrated into the wrong goods for commercial purposes.


There's no question in gaming or therapy that the next development stage will allow one to go out into the big world inside his new body and encounter other avatars, so that they can apply the effects of others to his new body. There's a wide range of possibilities and the research is really in its infancy.


Virtual Reality, Augmented and Artificial Intelligence 2021 specialist Amit Caesar wrote the article.
Send me an email: caesaramit@gmail.com


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